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Posted by on 15 Feb 2015 in Bradley Smoker, Cold Smoking, Featured, Fish | 0 comments

Cold Smoked Pollack, Tomato & Spinach Bruschetta

Cold Smoked Pollack, Tomato & Spinach Bruschetta

I had intended to smoke cod this week, but a thick, skinless loin of pollack caught my eye. This firm, flaked, white fish is not quite as delicate in flavour as cod but sensational all the same writes Sandra Tate… Curing & Smoking the Pollack Loin Dissolve 70g sea salt & 30g light brown sugar in 500ml boiling water and allow to cool completely. Immerse the 800g pollack loin in the brine in a snug container and leave for 1 hour. Rinse and dry completely on kitchen paper. Set up the Bradley Smoker with the cold smoke attachment and stack filled with Pacific Blend bisquettes then set to smoke for 2-3 hours (depending on your own preference for level of smokiness). Place the pollack on a wire rack in the centre of the cabinet. Again, depending on preference, open the top vent for light smoke and fully close for a more intense smoke. Remove from the cabinet, wrap tightly in cling film and store in the fridge until required....

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Posted by on 3 Dec 2014 in Bradley Smoker, Cold Smoking, Featured, Meat | 0 comments

Cure, Smoke, Boil, Glaze & Bake…

Cure, Smoke, Boil, Glaze & Bake…

I’m not a huge fan of gammon as a main course but at Christmas it has to be there for light lunch, sandwiches or a cold cuts platter. This small joint will cover that, and is the perfect beginners’ project for curing and smoking writes Sandra Tate…A modest joint of pork weighing in at up to a kilo can be dry cured in 4-5 days and makes this project ideal even for a novice. CURING For 1kg joint of pork (trimmed of rind, tied and preferably not thicker than 7-8cm) you will need a cure of 25g brown sugar, 50g curing salts, and an optional 5g pickling spices, lightly crushed. Mix all of these together and rub into the surface of the meat on all sides, pushing into crevices, and wrap tightly in several layers of cling film before placing in the bottom of your fridge. Leave for 5 days then unwrap (you will find that the pork is deeper in colour due to the curing salt and the...

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Posted by on 10 Sep 2014 in Bradley Smoker, Cold Smoking, Featured, Meat | 0 comments

Smoked Pigeon Breast, Pancetta & Salted Caramel Walnut Salad

Smoked Pigeon Breast, Pancetta & Salted Caramel Walnut Salad

Not yet time to give up the salads but now we get Autumnal! Pigeon packs a serious taste punch but also benefits from a whiff of smoking, then married with the salt-sweet taste of these walnuts it is something sublime writes Sandra Tate…Here in Totnes pigeon is available from all three of our High Street butchers but I opted to buy from the one who dispenses with the tougher parts of the bird and sells pigeon breasts in packs of 2, 4 or 6. Pigeon can so very easily become tough and dry from overcooking and ideally should be served very pink. I therefore opted to cold smoke my pigeon breasts to give it outer flavour before cooking. Pat dry the pigeon breasts – allowing 1-2 breasts per person – and arrange on a Bradley Smoker wire rack, well spaced to ensure all over smoking. Set up the smoker to cold smoke and add oak bisquettes to the stack. Almost close the top vent and allow the cabinet to...

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Posted by on 9 Apr 2014 in Bradley Smoker, Cold Smoking, Featured, Fish | 0 comments

Simon Rogan’s Smoked Roe Cream

Simon Rogan’s Smoked Roe Cream

This recipe was given to us by Dr Chet Sharma, Head of Research and Development for Simon Rogan of L’Enclume in Cumbria. Many thanks Dr Chet Sharma!The team operate from Aulis (the development kitchen/bar where new techniques, technologies, and ingredients are explored and new dishes created). Aulis also opens its doors to up to six diners who have a meal prepared before them from an open kitchen, and experience dishes before they appear on the L’Enclume menu. SMOKED ROE CREAM This is a simple emulsion to make, luxuriously silky in texture and rammed with flavour. I have no idea with what this is used at L’Enclume, undoubtedly one of many exquisite elements that make up a dish there. For me it begged to partner sweet, juicy scallops. Ingredients 250g plaice roes 10g fine sea salt 20g lemon juice 300g grape seed oil       Method Salt the roes evenly and place in a vacuum bag, or a freezer bag with air pushed out and sealed. Leave in the...

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Posted by on 3 Jan 2014 in Bradley Smoker, Cold Smoking, Fish | 0 comments

Bradley Smoked River Cobbler Fishcakes with Poached Eggs

Bradley Smoked River Cobbler Fishcakes with Poached Eggs

I confess to having never heard of this fish until this week when a pensioner in Sainsburys, talking to me in the fish section, recommending it highly. It is considerably cheaper than the cod and haddock that it otherwise closely resembles and is from a certified sustainable source, albeit Vietnam. I understand it is now available in several of the major supermarkets writes Sandra Tate … Brining & Smoking River Cobbler River cobbler is a delicate, white fleshed, flaky fish, not unlike cod or haddock and does not require heavy smoking; one hour in the Bradley imparts a lovely flavour without overwhelming it. First mix 100g fine sea salt with 450ml cold water to make a brine. Take a 250g pack of cobbler fillets and unpack into a snug fitting container then immerse in the brine. Leave for 30 minutes then rinse and pat completely dry on kitchen paper. Set up the Bradley Smoker for cold smoking (at this time of year I have found it to be cold enough...

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Posted by on 23 Feb 2011 in Bradley Smoker, Cold Smoking, Featured, Meat | 0 comments

Bradley Smoked Bacon

Bradley Smoked Bacon

I took charge of my Bradley smoker with a healthy mixture of excitement and trepidation, writes Sandra Tate ….  not least since the preparatory reading I had done was as confusing as it was helpful. Naturally I yearn to be slicing my first side of perfectly smoked salmon, or sliding a smoked oyster into the interior of a fillet steak, but best to learn how to crawl before taking an expensive gallop. So, pork belly strips seemed to be a good starting point, very inexpensive, but also extremely versatile if successful. At only 2cm thick, the belly strips were going to cure easily, nice and uniform, no thick areas. I used a 3:1 mix of salt to light brown sugar and lay the pieces over it and covered with it. Covered and refrigerated overnight it produced plenty of liquid and had turned from pale pink pork to red-brown bacon colour (a delight to the beginner in itself!) and was firm to the touch. I rinsed and soaked it for...

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