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Posted by on 7 Aug 2015 in Bradley Smoker, Cold Smoking, Fish | 0 comments

Seafood Salad with Cold Smoked Mussels

Seafood Salad with Cold Smoked Mussels

A mixed seafood salad is whatever you want it to be, choose the seafood you personally enjoy from favourite shellfish, prawns, squid and lobster and mix lightly with good olive oil, lemon juice and handfuls of salad leaves and herbs writes Sandra Tate…And to add an extra note of flavour to the mix, choose one or two items to be briefly cold smoked. I personally love lightly smoked mussels but you could equally enjoy cold smoked prawns or squid rings in there. The principal is to precook the seafood you want to smoke. For prawns it is probably easiest to buy them whole and ready cooked. Squid I would buy cleaned by my fish monger then prepare by cutting into rings and cooking for 3 minutes in boiling water before draining and refreshing with cold water. Once prepared could smoke any one of them with the same understated method. For mussels, rinse vigorously in cold water to make the live mussels close. Discard any that refuse to close and...

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Posted by on 12 Jul 2015 in Bradley Smoker, Fish, Hot Smoking | 0 comments

Hot Smoked Mackerel with Poached Egg, Potatoes, Broad Beans & Herbs

Hot Smoked Mackerel with Poached Egg, Potatoes, Broad Beans & Herbs

Isn’t it a joy when you’re generously given home-grown produce from friends and can bring it together with your own work, in this case my hot smoked mackerel? And a  memorable meal is made writes Sandra Tate…Hot smoked mackerel I made a few days ago, wrapped in kitchen parchment, it sat in the fridge until Fran arrived with a trug filled with her new potatoes, parsley, chives, broad beans, and more. To add to that I always have a basket full of multi coloured eggs from Sandra’s motley crew of special breed chickens. This delightful meal was the result of 20 minutes cooking time.But first… Curing & smoking mackerel:I ask for my mackerel to be cleaned and heads removed – I like to hot smoke them whole rather than filleted, but have no need for a face on it. For two large, very fresh mackerel I mixed a cure of 50g sea salt mixed with 30g natural sugar. Rub this into the cavity and over the skin, drop them...

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Posted by on 6 May 2015 in Bradley Smoker, Featured, Fish, Hot Smoking | 0 comments

Hot Smoked Cajun Salmon with Pasta, Rocket Pesto & Spring Vegetables

Hot Smoked Cajun Salmon with Pasta, Rocket Pesto & Spring Vegetables

I have found that the combination of hot smoked salmon with a Cajun spices crust is a total delight with this light, Spring vegetable pasta writes Sandra Tate…Hot smoked salmon, with the minimum of cure time, is a thing of great succulence and beauty, and the smoky flavours of fish and spices is one that you will want to return to again and again. Curing and Smoking the Salmon Mix together 30g salt and 20g unrefined sugar in 400ml of water in a snug container, immerse 4 salmon fillets for 20-30 minutes, then rinse and pat completely dry. Set the Bradley Smoker to a cabinet temperature of 75°C/150°F and add oak bisqettes to the stack. Allow the cabinet to reach the required temperature and fill with smoke. Coat the upper surface of the fillets with Cajun Spice mix (available in most supermarkets) to cover, patting down to form a dry crust, transfer to a Bradley wire rack and smoke for 1 hour. Set aside in a warm place. Hot...

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Posted by on 19 Apr 2015 in Bradley Smoker, Featured, Fish, Hot Smoking | 0 comments

Hot Smoked Gilt-head Bream & Scallop Risotto

Hot Smoked Gilt-head Bream & Scallop Risotto

Gilt-head bream is such an eye-catcher, and the last one at the market on Friday was begging to be hot smoked writes Sandra Tate…I’m always eager to try something new and quite honestly I’ve never heard of anyone smoking gilt-head bream – though I’m sure some are as it turned out to be sensational in its delicate, pure white, succulent way. I have a marked preference to smoke fish whole; skin on, head on etc. The flesh then retains its oils and juices and the smoke flavour does not overwhelm the sweetness of the fish. To Cure & Smoke For my 700g gilt-head bream I mixed 50g sea salt with 25g natural sugar and rubbed the fish inside and out – leaving it in a stainless steel bowl for half an hour. I set up the Bradley Smoker with plenty of Alder bisquettes in the stack, and the cabinet temperature to 110°C/220°F. Rinse the fish thoroughly and pat dry with kitchen towel, inside and out. Set on a wire...

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Posted by on 15 Feb 2015 in Bradley Smoker, Cold Smoking, Featured, Fish | 0 comments

Cold Smoked Pollack, Tomato & Spinach Bruschetta

Cold Smoked Pollack, Tomato & Spinach Bruschetta

I had intended to smoke cod this week, but a thick, skinless loin of pollack caught my eye. This firm, flaked, white fish is not quite as delicate in flavour as cod but sensational all the same writes Sandra Tate… Curing & Smoking the Pollack Loin Dissolve 70g sea salt & 30g light brown sugar in 500ml boiling water and allow to cool completely. Immerse the 800g pollack loin in the brine in a snug container and leave for 1 hour. Rinse and dry completely on kitchen paper. Set up the Bradley Smoker with the cold smoke attachment and stack filled with Pacific Blend bisquettes then set to smoke for 2-3 hours (depending on your own preference for level of smokiness). Place the pollack on a wire rack in the centre of the cabinet. Again, depending on preference, open the top vent for light smoke and fully close for a more intense smoke. Remove from the cabinet, wrap tightly in cling film and store in the fridge until required....

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Posted by on 16 Oct 2014 in Bradley Smoker, Featured, Fish, Hot Smoking | 0 comments

Hot Smoked Trout, Spinach & Horseradish Soufflé Tart

Hot Smoked Trout, Spinach & Horseradish Soufflé Tart

To keep my smoked trout as juicy as possible I decided that on this occasion I would keep the fish whole, after all, there has to be a good reason why Arbroath Smokies and kippers aren’t filleted before smoking! A little more of a fiddle to remove the flesh afterwards but I think it was worth it writes Sandra Tate…Take 2 large fresh trout. To cure and smoke your trout first mix 30g sea salt with 30g light brown sugar and the grated zest of a lemon. Remove the trout heads and pack some of the mix into the cavities then over the skin. Leave in a container (they will give up some moisture) for 30 minutes then rinse thoroughly and dry completely with kitchen paper. Lightly oil the skin to stop the fish from sticking and lay on a Bradley wire rack. Leave to stand for an hour to dry further, the skin will by now be quite leathery. Meanwhile, set up the Bradley Smoker and preheat the...

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