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Posted by on 21 Dec 2016 in Featured, Kamado Joe, Meat |

Roast Duck & Roasted Vegetables

Roast Duck & Roasted Vegetables

Getting into the festive frame of mind I decided to make a duckilicious roast on Kamado Joe  – and with vegetables roasting around the bird in all that lovely duck fat, writes Sandra Tate… This is a perfect example of one dish/pot cooking with the duck generating fat and the vegetables taking that up to colour beautifully and become rich with duck/smoky Kamado Joe flavour. Very little preparation is needed, I like to scrub the vegetables rather than peel them, and all are left quite chunky. Fill the Kamado Joe to the air holes with charcoal, light and open vents to get it up and running before putting the heat deflector at the low level with grill rack at normal level. Establish a constant 180°C-190°C roasting temperature by setting the top and bottom vents. A duck of this size will feed 4-6 depending on appetite, it is after all very rich. Allow at least one of each vegetable/person as a rough guide. Begin by trimming and cutting 4 young...

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Posted by on 18 Nov 2016 in Featured, Meat, Ozpig |

Pork, Cider & Sweet Vegetable Casserole

Pork, Cider & Sweet Vegetable Casserole

Comfort food for cold, crisp days (or evenings) around a toasty Ozpig stove, writes Sandra Tate… So often simple is best, and this simple casserole/stew is a family favourite. Pork (in this case pork shoulder) is a very cheap option and takes much less cooking time to become super tender than cuts of stewing beef. I removed the rind and made crackling/pork scratchings so there was no waste from this 1kg pork shoulder joint. Vegetables may be a matter of taste so feel free to use your own favourite roots, I used red onions, carrots, parsnip, sweet potato, garlic cloves and Anja potatoes. A crisp, dry cider is good as the vegetables bring sweetness to the dish but it is a stew and I would save the good cider to drink with it, not to cook with! Peel all vegetables, including a couple of fat cloves of garlic, allowing at least 3 whole vegetables/person (don’t worry about the Anja potaoes, just rinse them). Prepare the onion, carrots, parsnip, sweet...

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Posted by on 10 Aug 2016 in Featured, Kamado Joe, Meat |

Sticky Pork Belly & Roasted Sweet Vegetables

Sticky Pork Belly & Roasted Sweet Vegetables

Pork belly is so deliciously rich, it goes a very long way – a very good thing when you have a visiting son planning to entertain a bunch of old school mates over food and beers writes Sandra Tate… I also like pork belly as you can get amazing results in 6-7 hours, a lot less than pulled pork, but just as sensational. I personally prefer to cook it on the bone but ask my butcher to not only score the rind, but also carefully detach it from the joint so that at the end of the cooking time on Kamado Joe I can put it in my oven at high temperature to turn it into the most amazing crackling. In the morning I got my 3kg pork belly joint up to room temperature and rubbed under the rind and over flesh with a mix of 50g sea salt and 30g freshly ground black pepper. Make a sticky BBQ sauce by mixing 2tsp tamarind paste; 2tbsp runny honey; 3...

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Posted by on 12 Jul 2016 in Featured, Kamado Joe, Meat, Uncategorized, Vegetable |

Spicy Chicken Joints & Paneer Kebabs

Spicy Chicken Joints & Paneer Kebabs

For a hot day, crack out the light beers and spice up the BBQ with Indian influences writes Sandra Tate… … and have chapati or paratha at the ready and thick yoghurt to complete the line up! Light up Kamado Joe and aim for a steady temperature of 200°C with the lid down – grill on the standard grill rack or on black iron griddle if you prefer. For the chicken I chose to use thigh and leg joints, they are less likely to be dry once cooked and I think have more flavour – just be sure that they are cooked through to the bone! First prepare a dry rub – this is a generous quantity which you can keep in an airtight jar for a week or so and it will be enough to rub a lot of chicken pieces. Sprinkle onto the joints as you would with salt and pepper – don’t overdo it – and rub into the flesh. Dry Rub: Place 1tsp cumin seed,...

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Posted by on 19 Jun 2016 in Bradley Smoker, Featured, Hot Smoking, Meat |

Smoked Guinea Fowl, Cornish New Potato & Mixed Bean Salad with Mint

Smoked Guinea Fowl, Cornish New Potato & Mixed Bean Salad with Mint

Deliciously juicy Bradley smoked guinea fowl and this glorious bean and Cornish new potato salad is the epitome of Summer lunch, writes Sandra Tate… Guinea fowl is a small bird, but when smoked is so rich in flavour it would easily satisfy 8 people for this lovely Summer lunch dish. To make it easier/quicker to smoke I spatchcocked it (split the backbone from parson’s nose to neck end and flattened it) so that it will lie flat on the Bradley wire rack. To brine and smoke: First make a brine by adding 75g sea salt to 25g dark molasses sugar (ordinary sugar if you wish) to enough boiling water to dissolve it. Then add chilled water to make enough brine to barely cover the bird. Leave for 1 hour then rinse thoroughly and pat dry with kitchen paper. Meanwhile add apple bisquettes to the Bradley Smoker and set the cabinet temperature to 150°C. Lay the guinea fowl skin side up on a wire rack and transfer to the Bradley...

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Posted by on 9 May 2016 in Featured, Meat, Ozpig |

Moroccan Lamb with Fragrant Mint & Lemon Couscous

Moroccan Lamb with Fragrant Mint & Lemon Couscous

The Ozpig has arrived and what a delight it is to cook on it! I used a black iron lidded pot but this is essentially a tagine recipe writes Sandra Tate… The Ozpig is a camper’s dream, giving both warmth and a hotplate on which to cook a surprisingly large repertoire of dishes; from breakfast fry up to kebabs, grills, steaks and one pot cooking, it covers them all. Today I popped a few bits of kindling, lit up and added logs and away I went with this fragrant dish. Moroccan Lamb with Fragrant Mint & Lemon Couscous – serves 3-4 For the early stages I placed my iron pot directly on to the hot plate – hot enough for me to firstly fry off 1 finely sliced onion; 3cm cube of peeled fresh ginger, finely chopped; 4 cloves garlic, peeled & finely chopped in a couple of tbsp olive oil. Once softened add 600g lamb shoulder, diced and turn to brown a little to seal; then add 1...

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