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Posted by on 15 Jan 2017 in Bradley Smoker, Featured, Fish, Hot Smoking |

Hot Mackerel Nicoise

Hot Mackerel Nicoise

Smoked mackerel is a huge family favourite and as such is worth hot smoking in bulk so that there’s always a fillet or two available from the freezer too, writes Sandra Tate... Hot Smoking the Mackerel I prefer a sugar/salt brine as the sugar seems to make for a milder sweet smoke flavour. For 4 mackerel, filleted and cleaned, mix 50g sea salt with 60g light brown sugar and juice of a small lemon with 500ml hot water until dissolved, then allow to cool completely. In a snug container, immerse the fillets and leave for 30 minutes then rinse off thoroughly, pat dry and lay on Bradley steel wire baskets, spaced apart from each other. Leave the fillets to dry in a cool, airy, place for an hour (not the fridge) whilst you heat the Bradley Smoker cabinet to 190°F/85°C, load with  Oak Bisquettes, and smoke for about 45 mins – 1 hour or until cooked to an internal temperature of 72°C  Allow to cool then refrigerate until needed. For the Salad...

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Posted by on 19 Jun 2016 in Bradley Smoker, Featured, Hot Smoking, Meat |

Smoked Guinea Fowl, Cornish New Potato & Mixed Bean Salad with Mint

Smoked Guinea Fowl, Cornish New Potato & Mixed Bean Salad with Mint

Deliciously juicy Bradley smoked guinea fowl and this glorious bean and Cornish new potato salad is the epitome of Summer lunch, writes Sandra Tate… Guinea fowl is a small bird, but when smoked is so rich in flavour it would easily satisfy 8 people for this lovely Summer lunch dish. To make it easier/quicker to smoke I spatchcocked it (split the backbone from parson’s nose to neck end and flattened it) so that it will lie flat on the Bradley wire rack. To brine and smoke: First make a brine by adding 75g sea salt to 25g dark molasses sugar (ordinary sugar if you wish) to enough boiling water to dissolve it. Then add chilled water to make enough brine to barely cover the bird. Leave for 1 hour then rinse thoroughly and pat dry with kitchen paper. Meanwhile add apple bisquettes to the Bradley Smoker and set the cabinet temperature to 150°C. Lay the guinea fowl skin side up on a wire rack and transfer to the Bradley...

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Posted by on 13 Mar 2016 in Bradley Smoker, Featured, Fish, Hot Smoking | 0 comments

Hot Smoked Salmon with Dill, Horseradish & Spring Vegetable Pasta

Hot Smoked Salmon with Dill, Horseradish & Spring Vegetable Pasta

I know we’re not quite there yet but this Spring green pasta with juicy flakes of hot smoked pasta certainly make you feel like you’re there writes Sandra Tate… Hot smoked salmon is seriously moreish, and a little goes a long way as it is so deliciously rich and oily. Ideal over pasta but equally amazing in a sandwich, or on toast with avocado and poached egg… Curing and Smoking Mix together 40g salt and 30g unrefined molasses sugar in 500ml of hot water in a snug container, allow to go completely cold and immerse a 700g side of salmon for  1 hour, then rinse and pat completely dry. Leave to dry further on a Bradley rack while you set up the smoker. Set the Bradley Smoker to a cabinet temperature of 95°C/200°F and add oak bisqettes to the stack. Allow the cabinet to reach the required temperature and fill with smoke, then place the salmon in the middle of the cabinet and smoke for about 2 hours  –...

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Posted by on 10 Oct 2015 in Bradley Smoker, Featured, Hot Smoking, Meat | 0 comments

Hot Smoked Pheasant

Hot Smoked Pheasant

October; it has to be smoked game and the pheasants were calling out to me from the butcher’s window writes Sandra Tate…I have to say I was spoiled for choice what with there being teal, mallard, pigeon and grouse there too but I prefer to smoke a bigger bird, less chance of drying out the meat. These two were plump male birds with almost no shot damage. Find a snug container to cure the bird in before smoking. Now prepare a brine by adding enough boiling water to 50g sea salt and 25g unrefined sugar to be able to fully immerse the birds. Allow it to cool completely before doing so. Leave for 1 hour then rinse thoroughly and pat completely dry inside and out with kitchen paper. Set the Bradley Smoker cabinet temperature to 240°F/115°C and add a dozen apple wood bisquettes to the stack. Once up to temperature sit the pheasant on a wire rack and place in the middle of the cabinet with the top vent...

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Posted by on 12 Jul 2015 in Bradley Smoker, Fish, Hot Smoking | 0 comments

Hot Smoked Mackerel with Poached Egg, Potatoes, Broad Beans & Herbs

Hot Smoked Mackerel with Poached Egg, Potatoes, Broad Beans & Herbs

Isn’t it a joy when you’re generously given home-grown produce from friends and can bring it together with your own work, in this case my hot smoked mackerel? And a  memorable meal is made writes Sandra Tate…Hot smoked mackerel I made a few days ago, wrapped in kitchen parchment, it sat in the fridge until Fran arrived with a trug filled with her new potatoes, parsley, chives, broad beans, and more. To add to that I always have a basket full of multi coloured eggs from Sandra’s motley crew of special breed chickens. This delightful meal was the result of 20 minutes cooking time.But first… Curing & smoking mackerel:I ask for my mackerel to be cleaned and heads removed – I like to hot smoke them whole rather than filleted, but have no need for a face on it. For two large, very fresh mackerel I mixed a cure of 50g sea salt mixed with 30g natural sugar. Rub this into the cavity and over the skin, drop them...

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Posted by on 6 May 2015 in Bradley Smoker, Featured, Fish, Hot Smoking | 0 comments

Hot Smoked Cajun Salmon with Pasta, Rocket Pesto & Spring Vegetables

Hot Smoked Cajun Salmon with Pasta, Rocket Pesto & Spring Vegetables

I have found that the combination of hot smoked salmon with a Cajun spices crust is a total delight with this light, Spring vegetable pasta writes Sandra Tate…Hot smoked salmon, with the minimum of cure time, is a thing of great succulence and beauty, and the smoky flavours of fish and spices is one that you will want to return to again and again. Curing and Smoking the Salmon Mix together 30g salt and 20g unrefined sugar in 400ml of water in a snug container, immerse 4 salmon fillets for 20-30 minutes, then rinse and pat completely dry. Set the Bradley Smoker to a cabinet temperature of 75°C/150°F and add oak bisqettes to the stack. Allow the cabinet to reach the required temperature and fill with smoke. Coat the upper surface of the fillets with Cajun Spice mix (available in most supermarkets) to cover, patting down to form a dry crust, transfer to a Bradley wire rack and smoke for 1 hour. Set aside in a warm place. Hot...

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