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Posted by on 21 Jan 2016 in Featured, Kamado Joe, Meat | 0 comments

Spatchcocked Chicken Stuffed with Sage, Garlic & Shallot Butter

Spatchcocked Chicken Stuffed with Sage, Garlic & Shallot Butter

Sage survives well throughout the Winter months, save for persistent exposure to frost, so I’ve been enjoying mine with vegetables, pork, and today with chicken writes Sandra Tate… By spatchcocking a chicken you can cook in a shorter time, it’s also easier to lift and separate the skin from the flesh and to create pocket space for stuffing or herb butter. Quite simply you cut through the backbone of your chicken from neck end to parson’s nose with a kitchen knife or scissors, press down on the breastbone and the bird is now flattened. Once you’ve done this, gently push your fingers under the skin at the cavity end, lifting and separating it firstly from the breast then up and over the thighs and legs – being as careful as you can to avoid tears in the skin. Get the Kamado Joe lit and ready to a steady temperature of 200°C with heat deflector at low level and grill rack at high level. For the stuffing: If you want...

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Posted by on 7 Dec 2015 in Featured, Kamado Joe, Meat | 0 comments

Christmas Cold Cuts: Smokey Turkey Thighs

Christmas Cold Cuts: Smokey Turkey Thighs

My family are all about rib of beef at Christmas but smokey turkey thigh is a must for the cold cuts on Boxing day, and for lunchtime sandwiches, writes Sandra Tate… Weighing in at around 750g each, two or three of these beasts go a long way, and they’re relatively cheap in the Christmas eating scheme of things. Light Curing If you want the meat to be succulent then a brief cure is worth doing – but not absolutely necessary. Dissolve 50g sea salt and 20g light brown sugar in a little hot water. Allow to cool then dilute with enough cold water to be able to scantly cover 2 large turkey thighs in a snug container. Leave for an hour then remove, rinse well and thoroughly dry with kitchen paper. Smoking Turkey Thighs on Kamado Joe While the turkey sits in brine, get the grill up and running to a steady temperature of 140°C (add hardwood shavings over the charcoal if you wish) with the heat deflector at...

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Posted by on 10 Nov 2015 in Featured, Kamado Joe, Meat | 0 comments

Lamb Shanks Rogan Josh

Lamb Shanks Rogan Josh

With such a lot of weather about I find the low and slow ever more appealing, not only because I can pop something into the Kamado Joe and leave it unattended for an age, but also because the results are always spectacular writes Sandra Tate…Get your Kamado Joe lit and settled to a sedate 140°C. Place the heat deflector at low level and the grill rack above at high level. Now as this is going to cook long and slowly I don’t feel the need to mess with browning and cooking things before bringing them together in one pot. Instead peel and slice 2 large onions and place in a deep roasting tray together with 4 lamb shanks, 4 large ripe tomatoes, roughly chopped, 300ml water, 6 cloves peeled & crushed garlic and 2.5cm peeled & grated fresh ginger, 2 tsp salt, a good grinding of black pepper, 1 rounded tbsp paprika, and ½-1tsp red chilli powder. Now briefly fry 2tsp lightly crushed cumin seeds together with 2tsp lightly...

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Posted by on 8 Oct 2015 in Baking, Featured, Kamado Joe | 0 comments

Big Bread Bake Off

Big Bread Bake Off

So everyone’s into baking now, or so it seems. Can’t say as I’m a cake lover but I sure do like my homemade bread writes Sandra Tate…You just can’t beat the smell of homemade bread, so today I lit up the Kamado Joe to bake a couple of hefty loaves of sourdough and tantalise the neighbours. It takes a long while to make, but the effort required is minimal, sour dough is just a waiting game. For sour you must, of course, have to have the mother substance, the starter which will be your substitute for bakers yeast. This is mine, fed every time I take from it; it has now given about 6 years’ service, kept in the fridge and ready for my twice weekly bake. It would take a post all of its own to describe how to make your starter in the first instance so I suggest that you consult the experts – like Richard Bertinet, or Dan Lepard. Start the proceedings the night before by...

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Posted by on 13 Sep 2015 in Featured, Kamado Joe, Meat | 1 comment

Smoky Six Hour Pork Belly

Smoky Six Hour Pork Belly

I served this to a couple of friends last night and one asked if she had died and gone to heaven, I told her I’d gone with her writes Sandra Tate…This is a simple low and slow method that produces a meltingly tender result. Firstly the the Kamado Joe needs to be made ready by establishing a constant temperature of 120°C-130°C and to do this the bottom vent will be open by a mere 1-2cm and the daisy wheel barely half open. This will produce the desired smoking temperature – I did not add shavings, I’m more than happy with the charcoal smoke. Place the heat deflector at low level (with a drip tray on it) with grill rack at high level. A 1.6kg piece of pork belly, on the bone and complete with rind, fed 4 of us – which sounds rather greedy but to be fair we would willingly have eaten more. Rub the meat side with a mix of 20g unrefined sugar and 20g sea salt...

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Posted by on 7 Aug 2015 in Featured, Kamado Joe, Meat | 0 comments

Boned, Rolled & Stuffed Shoulder of Lamb

Boned, Rolled & Stuffed Shoulder of Lamb

There’s quite nothing like a slow cooked lamb shoulder to keep the entire family happy, and boned, stuffed  and rolled makes for easy carving too writes Sandra Tate…I bone myself but your butcher would do it for you. As for the stuffing, I like to use the herbs and seasonings that suit the meat and combine them with freshly crumbed bread and butter to make a full flavoured interior to the joint. Make ready with Kamado Joe by lighting charcoal and settling it to 140°C with heat deflector ( both half moons if you have Divide & Conquer) at the lower level and grill rack at higher level. Take 8 thick slices of bread, (preferably dry as it will crumb more willingly) and blitz to crumbs in a food processor together with 1 onion, peeled & roughly chopped; 50g cold butter, diced; 5-6 anchovies (optional); 2 cloves garlic, crushed; grated zest of 1 lemon; leaves of a generous sprig of rosemary; handful of parsley; salt, pepper and 1 large...

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